“The PlanetShifter.com Survival Guide to 2010: Curriculum Plans, Thought Leader Interviews and Big Green Ideas,” based on the Event Circle Interviews, by Willi Paul.

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“The PlanetShifter.com Survival Guide to 2010: Curriculum Plans, Thought Leader Interviews and Big Green Ideas,” based on the Event Circle Interviews, by Willi Paul.

Odyssey’s Come, Odyssey’s Go

Intro: "Willi's Green Box:" New green stories and myth generator

Chapter 1. Urban Localization

Chapter 2. Green Community Making

Chapter 3. Is Sustainability a Religion?

Chapter 4. The New Green Hero

Chapter 5. Survival of the Greenest?

Chapter 6. The Shaman in Our Musical Universe

Chapter 7. Green Symbols and Myth Making

Chapter 8. The GreenLife Flame

* * * * *

Intro: "Willi's Green Box:" New green stories and myth generator

Fall into my hypothesis for a while?

As far flung as I am already...

I’m trying to “come back” -- as Campbell wants -- and fill you all in…

"Hear I come," as the big bear shouts to Goldie Locks!!

How do we create and teach and enjoy the new green planet?

Thru new gas-less cars? Organic pears? Good Will pants?

Maybe.

Take out the trash.

God, we do this uncherished act way too much.

It seems to interrupt the day, right?

But composting is way different. Ask your kid.

Recycling, its so-green precursor, is now a cool game, a prized act of reverence for the Earth,… a prayer for Peace.

Ah, composting?! This is an act of helping reduce waste and grow new foods and flowers!

Back to the hypothesis!

Review the five stages to “mythic story”... I'm the dart board.

What’s in your box?

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Chapter 1. Urban Localization

Urban Localization: A GreenSource Knowledge Paper from PlanetShifter.com
Driven by the Event Circle Interview Series

I. What is localization?

From Bay Localize’s (draft) Principles of Localization:


  • Sustainable use and reuse of regional resources
  • Vibrant economies which circulate wealth and opportunities locally
  • Social equity in meeting basic needs of all community members
  • Community control of essential resources
  • Community empowerment in public decision making

Email from Kirsten Schwind to WP. Kirsten is Program Director at Bay Localize. 09-05-08 (Kirsten at baylocalize dot org)

II. What the Event Circle Experts Say (via 5 categories)?

Healthy Food
It is not that food is grown near-by, but that organic foods now must blend into the mix for all communities from the Mission District in SF to the Whole Foods crowd in Walnut Creek. Food suppliers and restaurants can help their costs and selection by employing a “Local Forager,” as Whole Foods does.

This is all about backyard and other urban gardens! Food need to be fresh, healthy, local with a commitment to the local producers who supply it.

Personal Responsibility
Localization mandates increasing levels of self-sufficiency, to the betterment of our families, neighborhoods and towns. Increased responsibility is seen as an change agent role in facing and removing long engrained conflicts associated with our dependence on distant energy and food systems. It is now our challenge to support local ventures and local talent.

Transportation and Production
Local distribution equates to local manufacture and greater transparency of the supply chains and an interdependent sense of responsibility for the land and people.

Shifting Politics and Capital
People can now exert some influence on their local schools and businesses. This produces a significant portion of the goods, services, food, and energy they consume from its own local endowment of financial, natural, and human capital. Regional and local funders loan to area businesses, keeping the community and feedback in mind. Localization hopes to restore an efficient balance between local production and imports.

Environmental Impacts
We need to focus on local and community vs. larger, national efforts and projects. Not just about reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but how the human and natural eco systems support each other on a daily basis. Check out the negative social and environmental externalities of inefficient trade and how if an “energy intensive “ approach is viable for locally produced, owned and distributed goods and services.

III. What are the Benefits of Localization?
Localizing our economy and lives offers many benefits, including:


  • Creates worthwhile jobs and economic opportunities in our communities
  • Strengthens the local economy by bringing back production and keeping money circulating locally
  • Reduces our dependence on distant places for essential goods and services
  • Reduces energy consumed and CO2 emitted in transporting goods and people
  • Brings the community together and reinvigorates the sense of place and camaraderie
  • Fosters an appreciation and respect of ecological systems favoring protection and restoration
  • Makes the economy more manageable as opposed to relying on the vast global marketplace
  • Refocuses our lives on family, friends, and community instead of place-less networks
  • Encourages cooperation with neighbors rather than competing for constant gain

IV. Supplemental Data:

The full quotes on the localization question from the Event Circle Interviews are included below:

Earl Brizee, Oakland Whole Foods Market Manager
www.planetshifter.com/node/1311
We work with hundreds of local vendors including East West Gourmet and Gelateria Naia Gelato. Also, I wanted to bring your attention to the Whole Foods Market Local Producer Loan Program – a loan program that is making $10 million available nationally for low-interest loans to small, community-based food producers. In this era of financial instability and with small business loans hard to get, I thought highlighting this program to your small business readers would be very helpful. Whole Foods Market was founded on the concept of fresh, healthy, local food and we remain, to this day, committed to local food and to the producers who supply it.
That said, Whole Foods Market started the program in Feb. 2007 and to date has loaned over $400K to Northern California businesses and over $2 million nationally. Some local recipients include Coracao Confections (www.coracaoconfections.com), St. Benoît Yogurt (www.stbenoit.com) and Kombucha Botanica (www.kombuchabotanica.com). To our knowledge, no other grocery retailer makes loans to its suppliers. Recipients have used the loans to purchase equipment, for the most part, which has helped them collectively increase production.
Finally, Whole Foods Market has a Local Forager – Harvindar Singh – on staff whose sole duty is to focus on local products. He ensures every Northern California store carries unique, local products and also facilitates the loan program. It’s also important to note that thru this program, small business not only get the loan, but they get sage advice from Whole Foods Market regarding sales, marketing and distribution.

Trathen Heckman, Daily Acts Organization and Green Sangha
www.planetshifter.com/node/1238
As is often the case with such questions, it depends. While there are countless possible angles to answer this from, it’s about what is appropriate to the topic at hand be it food, energy, water, manufacturing? Depending on the scale you are working at there are different strategies. Strategies applied in an urban garden will differ from those that are applied on a two-acre site. It also depends on factors such as modes of transportation. I recently learned that food grown 100 miles away may be more energy intensive than food grown thousands of miles away depending on transportation.

Laura Tam, Sustainable Development Policy Director, San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association (SPUR)
www.planetshifter.com/node/1341
I don't really use this word, but I certainly believe that local decisions have global implications. Reducing greenhouse gas emissions, for example, is an essential local response to a pressing global issue.

Inna Leavitt, The reMake Lounge, SF
www.planetshifter.com/node/1292
I think of localization in terms of self-sufficiency. When a community can rely on itself for its needs it removes the conflicts associated with dependence. Keeping things regional is also environmentally friendly as shipping and transportation accounts for a huge chunk of our impact. I really appreciate supporting local ventures and taking advantage of the local talent.

Scot Case, VP, TerraChoice
www.planetshifter.com/node/1327
Very carefully. Localization is just one part of the sustainability puzzle. It is a term, like sustainability, that has many different definitions depending on who is defining it. Some people use it to mean local distribution, while others use it to mean local manufacture using only locally available resources. Instead of focusing on localization, I tend to focus on the global environmental benefits.

Dara O’Rourke, CEO, GoodGuide.com
www.planetshifter.com/node/1299
We are currently focused on rating manufactured products such as personal care, household chemicals, toys, and food. We are gradually adding more data on the country of origin as it is required by law (such as with fruits and vegetables this year).

Unfortunately, for most products, it is virtually impossible to find out the exact location of the factory or farm. One of our goals with GoodGuide is to work with other stakeholders to motivate greater transparency of the supply chains that produce the products we consume.

Amy Tobin, Executive Director, The Brower Center
www.planetshifter.com/node/1318
How far do you need to go to get basic goods and services? How far must goods and services travel to get to you? How much does your immediate, physical community support itself by exchanging goods and services? Do you feel an interdependent sense of responsibility for the land and people around you?

Tom Kelly, Kyotousa.org and HELiOS Project
www.planetshifter.com/node/1306
It’s where you, as a citizen, are able to exert some influence, e.g. local government, school, university, workplace, place of worship, and the like. “You can’t change the world, but you can change the world you live in.” And one motivated person or small group can have a truly remarkable effect.

Aaron Lehmer Bay Localize
www.planetshifter.com/node/350
Economic localization is the process by which a region, county, city, or even neighborhood frees itself from an overdependence on the global economy to a more self-reliant economy that invests in its own resources to provide for its needs. Most importantly, a more localized economy produces a significant portion of the goods, services, food, and energy it consumes from its own local endowment of financial, natural, and human capital. Economic localization brings production of goods and services closer to their point of consumption, reducing the need to rely on long supply chains and distant markets so that communities and regions can, for the most part, provision themselves. While it is certainly not possible to produce every kind of good and service locally, economic localization seeks to restore an efficient balance between local production and imports that reduces local economic vulnerability and minimizes the negative social and environmental externalities of inefficient trade.

Patricia Dines, Writer, Public Speaker, and Community Educator
www.planetshifter.com/node/1244
We’ll get what we support. Local and organic are not inherently tied, so I encourage people to support both and understand the specific benefits that each brings. Local generally increases freshness, reduces food transportation pollution, and encourages a local food supply; organic stops the poisoning of our earth and its people, and helps farmers return to working with nature. Both are valuable outcomes to nurture!

Lisa Francioni, Project Manager, California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance, and Environmental Affairs Coordinator, at the SF-based Wine Institute
www.planetshifter.com/node/1355

While CSWA recognizes that buying local is an important part of sustainability for the many benefits it creates by limiting emissions and fuel use from travel, keeping money in the local economy and supporting the community, we do not have any official definition of localization. Another important aspect of localization is knowledge of where products come from and how they are produced. We hope that consumers recognize that environmental stewardship and social responsibility are among the many reasons they should consider enjoying California wine.

Anca Novacovici - Eco-Coach, Inc.
www.planetshifter.com/node/1337
Localization is adapting a product to a local market. If this were to be applied to the world of sustainability, it would mean focusing on local and community vs. larger, national efforts and projects.

* * * * *

Chapter 2. Green Community Making

Four Trends in Green Community Making from Cooltribe.com, Greenwala.com, Greenopolis.com and Greenopia.com. GreenSource Knowledge Paper #2 from PlanetShifter.com - Driven by the Event Circle Interview Series

[ONE:] One big challenge for virtual communities is to bring members together in person. Without this face-to-face trust and knowledge building, local action and change is restricted.

Question One for the Four Site Leaders: Are you promoting off-site gatherings?

Hessia Fernandes: Cooltribe.com
Yes we are. Although I would like to reiterate that we are more of a digital movement, we are attending green festivals mainly in the UK. This summer we attended 10 festivals and it was fascinating to see how many people care about environmental issues and want to lower their carbon footprint.

Rajeev Kapur: Greenwala.com
Not yet, but we are close. You may hear more about these opportunities soon.

Joe Laur: Greenopolis.com
In a small way- we sponsored the dTour concerts this year, and have been active in some sports venues

Gay Browne: Greenopia.com

Not as much as I'd like. I'm hoping to change this moving forward.

[TWO:] If online community building “repeats itself,” then we may be in trouble. New models and tools are needed to bring diverse cultures, politics and geographic regions together.

Question Two for the Four Site Leaders: What online community models did / do you reference?

Cooltribe.com
We didn’t reference a specific online community model. Sure Facebook is a platform we look up to as they are hugely successful in getting people talking and as and when we develop, we will be including some of their key features. Treehugger is another online community that we get our inspiration from. I guess Cooltribe is a mixture of these models

Greenwala.com
There really wasn’t one community model that I can say we modeled Greenwala around. At the end of the day, our focus is on community, commerce, content and convenience. We perused Facebook and MySpace, Craigslist and green-focused sites like Treehugger. The Greenfeed on our site is a bit of a homage to Twitter and we recently integrated Yahoo Green into our site. In addition, the Greenwala store partners with Amazon.

Greenopolis.com
Facebook at first, but now more Huffington Post - we want people to come here and learn, and track their offline recycling and waste elimination.

Greenopia.com
We followed the Zagat style of book with the Michelin star ratings system. We feel that consumers need to have both experiences to make an informed decision. We are using YELPs community comments until our viewership is bigger.

[THREE:] Clearly, research at PlanetShifter.com supports the need to create new songs, symbols and stories in a mythic re-birth of the planet and our flagging consciousness. What symbols are you creating?

Question Three for the Four Site Leaders: Are you creating new green symbols and myths?

Cooltribe.com
I think our main symbol is our brand and the five claw marks. It truly means that we can all do our bit for the environment and leave a more natural legacy behind us.

Greenwala.com
Greenwala is creating a community. We hope that the Greenwala community becomes the symbol for those wanting to either learn how to be green/greener or want to provide their knowledge to the community and share their expertise.

Greenopolis.com
Let’ s hope so. We need them desperately. “Waste is food” needs to replace “throw it away”, “Live on solar income” needs to replace “drill baby, drill”!

Greenopia.com
Hopefully, not myths, but an appreciation and recognition for those businesses and services that are going the extra mile to be socially and ecologically responsible for their customers. The mission of our company is to make it easier to shop, eat and live a greener life.

[FOUR:] An online community without a change agenda is like a lion in a zoo. Can you conduct social activism from your home office?

Question Four for the Four Site Leaders: What social justice issues / campaigns are active at the community?

Cooltribe.com
Our current environmental campaign is our “saving the rainforests initiative”. We are passionate about helping the rainforests and work closely with our tree planting partner. The rainforest is one of the biggest and most important living stores of carbon on the planet through its ability to convert atmospheric carbon dioxide into solid carbon and keeping it locked in the tree trunks for centuries. At the current rate of deforestation, three quarters of the Amazon will be depleted by 2030. Cooltribe believes that by restoring vast areas of rainforest, it is possible to recapture carbon at a significant rate whilst protecting biodiversity and supporting local communities by providing them decent work.

Greenwala.com
For one, when anyone becomes a Greenwala member, we plant a tree in their name. We think this is a nice way to start your Greenwala experience. In addition, we have a contest for causes platform. See campaigns running for PETA, Thank you Ocean and others. We just completed campaigns that supported Trees For The Future, Kiva and Ashoka. Thousands of people have participated and we hope that this model will allow for people to truly engage with Green brands and support some great causes at the same time!

Greenopolis.com
A lot - Vitamin Angels is an NGO that gets vitamins to kids in Africa and elsewhere; Dean’s Beans brings fair trade and organic practices to coffee lands worldwide. Those are just two examples.

Greenopia.com
We deal with fair and direct trade, but we do come across some environmental justice issues from time to time.

[FIVE:] We desperately need a better Hero. We need to know who the so-called “thought leaders” follow and what new knowledge they bring to the table. Heroes take us along on their journeys. Who are yours?

Question Five: Who are your Heroes?

Cooltribe.com
Anita Roddick for trying something new and ethical at a stage when no one talked sustainability, climate change and so on. That is true leadership and vision. Jean Jacques Cousteau has been a big inspiration for me since I was a child. I am French and used to watch all his programmes. His passion for the environment and especially for the marine life was tantalizing and palpable even from the screen. A true hero in my eyes.

Greenwala.com
My parents, definitely. Also, my two sons. Every day I learn how to be a better father, friend and all-around person by being around them. My wife has been incredibly supportive throughout this whole journey and in many cases she is greener than I. Outside of my family, I grew up a huge Lakers fan (still am) and was amazed at what Magic Johnson could do. I am a student of Gandhi and love to read and learn about people that have made making a difference a priority.

Greenopolis.com
Gandhi, Israel Salanter, and anyone who takes the next small step to make a difference.

Greenopia.com
I have a lot of green heroes. The green area is full of notable and respectable individuals. Among them, Wangari Mathai, who won a Nobel Peace Prize for her work in planting trees in Africa and for breaking the forestry devastation. Andy Lipkus of Tree People for his urban forestry and early work in the environmental movement in Los Angeles. Ed Begley, for his eco-commitment, his humor and for using his background as an actor to get Hollywood involved. Laurie David for her activism in getting the 'Inconvenient Truth' on the big screen and for creating a website that has been very instrumental in raising political awareness. Bobby Kennedy for championing the need to keep our waterways clean and fish healthy....I could go on.

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Note: Please also enjoy the first GreenSource Knowledge Paper concerning Urban Localization.

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Chapter 3. Is Sustainability a Religion?

"Is Sustainability a New Religion?"
GreenSource Knowledge Paper Series: #3
Event Circle Interviews on PlanetShifter.com by Willi Paul

“A religion is a system of human thought which usually includes a set of narratives, symbols, beliefs and practices that give meaning to the practitioner's experiences of life through reference to a higher power, deity or deities, or ultimate truth. Religion is commonly identified by the practitioner's prayer, ritual, meditation, music and art, among other things, but more generally is interwoven with society and politics. It may focus on specific supernatural, metaphysical, and moral claims about reality (the cosmos and human nature) which may yield a set of religious laws, ethics, and a particular lifestyle. Religion also encompasses ancestral or cultural traditions, writings, history, and mythology, as well as personal faith and religious experience.”

Given the above definition and the feedback of the thought leaders on PlanetShifter.com, sustainability has many characteristics of a “religion.” But it is still too early to draw any firm conclusions. Consider the following summary points gleaned from the interviews as we move ahead:

  • Sustainability is more fluid, more of a movement, a dream. Sustainability is change and Less formalistic than say Christianity. More individualistic.
  • Sustainability = End of one world and the beginning of another – a Planetary paradigm shift.
  • Sustainability is a road map to the sacred and is Improving life conditions.
  • No. Good Science is better!
  • Sustainability unites all Earth people.
  • The notion of balance with the earth and cosmic laws makes sustainability a spiritual quest.
  • Sustainability is a set of beliefs that guide behavior.
  • Nothing is truly sustainable, though the term has been a quite useful concept.

Source Material
Select Event Circle Interviews:

Interview with Divina Klein and Douglas Mackar of La ForzaDIVINA:

I don't think at all that endeavor to create sustainability and a life that is more harmonious with nature has anything to do with religion whatsoever, on the contrary. While most religion is so self-centered on the human relationship with the divine and does not provide practical solutions for the environmental problems that are right in front of us, the era of sustainability has brought forth strategies to restore and support the natural world. I am sure the future is going to be about a much different way of living, back to the roots, back to nature, back to self-sufficiency, so in that sense it is going to be the end of a world.

DOUGLAS:

I don’t think this is an era of sustainability at all. In an ecological sense, the Native Americans lived a life of sustainability. Generations providing for themselves, that’s an era of sustainability. People fool themselves into believing they are living a sustainable life. I see it more as an era of realization that a sustainable life is necessary. I think “the end of the world” is just a metaphor for the end of a limited mind state. If you live in a box, and all you know is the world in that box, then of course you’d think it would be the end of the world if it was “prophesized” that the box was going to be removed, when in reality, a whole world of possibilities is suddenly emerging around you. The metaphor of the end of the world is sound, but it’s too easy to misinterpret. To paraphrase Chief Seattle, There is no death, just a changing of worlds. That can relate to the world around us as well as our physical body. I love change. I’m a student of change. What’s next is whatever we create. We are all creators of our own reality. As a collective of conscious individuals we have more power than we even imagine. Now we must not only imagine, but recognize that power and use it to create the world we’ve always dreamed of. Quiet the mind. Listen to nature. Live the dream. It’s so simple that it’s easy to overlook, to try too hard. What’s next is mastery of the self. What’s next is change.

Interview with Rajeev Kapur, Chief Wala, GreenWala.com

I like to call it a movement. The economy is creating a generation of young adults who will be trained on sustainability. This movement is causing Gen X and Boomers to pause and rethink about the ways in which they are doing things and how they are using their resources on a daily basis regardless of race, religion or political affiliation. We are on an unstoppable journey now.

Interview with Gay Browne, Founder of Greenopia.com

No, but I wish sustainability had more of an addictive quality. Instead of being an afterthought or a way to feel less guilty, it would be great if all the companies started out with the goal to create the best product they can without toxicity and high carbon footprint. Triple bottom line is a buzz word, but a good analogy.

Interview with Chris Deckker, founder of Earthdance

For me the purpose of "religion" is to create a roadmap to understand the sacredness of life. Once you realize that all life is sacred you naturally move towards living in a more sustainable way - i.e.: you strive to live in balance.

Interview with PlanetShifter.com Drupal engineer and San Francisco Musician / Artist / Writer Cheth Rowe

The era of sustainability is unlikely to last as long as, say, the era of Christianity, nor does it offer as much in the way of a supreme Creator—its industrial creators are reviled not deified—but it is clearly a belief system, which may be enough to earn the label of religion. I do believe mankind needs something to believe. Here at the end of the age of Christianity we are looking. If neither Islam’s 72 virgins nor establishing new human outposts on Alpha Centauri seem reasonable, then one must be a post-collapse citizen of planet Earth.

Interview with Hessia Fernandes, Co-Founder, Cooltribe.com

No I don’t think so. I define religion as a system of human thought linked to a set of beliefs and practices where gods and deities are often the core focus of prayers. They are different religions across the world which follow different set of practices and beliefs. I actually think that Sustainability is bigger than that as it is essential and it is truly universal. People can go through life by being atheists but people will understand (if they haven’t yet) that they cannot live without a sustainable planet. Also the set of practices of sustainability are the same throughout the world and they show that people, countries, races are totally interdependent. Sustainability truly unites people.

Interview with Anca Novacovici, Eco-Coach, Inc.

I hope sustainability is not a new 'religion, because many religions discourage 'nonbelievers' from becoming involved. I would like to believe that sustainability is facilitating a transition to a new paradigm shift where different groups see it as important, albeit for different reasons. For instance, there are individuals who see it as important because of national security, to lessen our dependence on foreign oil, while others are interested in helping God's creatures, and still others do it in order to decrease the rate of cancer, asthma, allergy and other diseases.

Interview with Joe Laur, Senior Manager, Greenopolis.com

Well, I hate the word sustainability- it’s like the word love- depends on who’s speaking it. I like resilience, regenerativity. I’ll settle for green. Religion literally means to reconnect- the same root as ligament. If it can reconnect us to what’s divine and irreplaceable in nature, each other, and in ourselves, it coils serve as a spiritual path. In the original Hebrew, there’s a phrase- “The fullness of the earth is God’s glory” That’s not too bad.

Interview with Andrew Vaucrosson, President of Greenrock.org

It depends to which aspects of religion you are referring. We would not wish people to think that belief in the value of sustainability is a matter of faith alone - the need to adopt a sustainable lifestyle is demonstrated all around us and supported by large amounts of scientific evidence. Equally, unlike some religious beliefs, sustainability is not an end in itself, it is a means to an end – improving living conditions both locally and globally in a way that can be afforded economically, socially and environmentally. However, if you mean that like many religious beliefs we feel it should underpin all aspects of daily life and should be evidenced in consideration for those around you and good stewardship of our planet, then yes.

Interview with internationally renowned author, lecturer and alchemist Dennis William Hauck

It does have a religious feel to it for some people. I think it is the idea of being in balance with the earth and cosmic laws that makes sustainability have this spiritual connotation to it. Of course, the alchemists all the way back to Egypt would have insisted it be treated as a spiritual quest. They saw Nature as the one great truth to which we have direct access, and revered her and tried to server her. They were and remain primarily Philosophers of Nature.

Interview with Berkeley performance artist and body healer Francesca Genco

If by “religion” you mean a set of beliefs that guide behavior, yes.

Interview with Adriana Paredes, COOPERHAF

Actually, the word “sustainability” can be used in many ways in different discourses, even as a justification for continuing using energy. That’s why I do not like to use word. The main feature of COOPERHAF consists in dealing with a more complex definition of housing. Our project goes “beyond” the house because draws attention to the importance of alternatives that may reduce vulnerability and poverty. Diversification is one of the strategies that are discussed together with the families in order to reduce seasonal income variability. Seasonal migration to other agricultural areas may be one option.

Furthermore, production for self consumption is also important because it guarantees that food supply for the family if crops suffer failure. Moreover, the project emphasizes the importance of the investment in a garden because it deals with the self - esteem of families. So, we look for the social reproduction of family farmers who contribute with the 70% of our national consumption (food) in Brazil. It is a national issue.

Interview with Composer Alan Tower, Founder of Green Music Network

No, not really. Both of those words, those concepts, I don’t think will continue to resonate on a deep level as our species evolves (unless it can’t anymore because the lungs of Gaia can’t breathe, or the blood of Gaia can’t support fish, unless Gaia just can’t support us anymore). To me “sustainability” is a not so interesting general word, what might it even be in real terms? The Sun becomes a red giant in 5 billion years. The Earth then vaporizes. Its got half of its life to go and then we go. Nothing is truly sustainable, though the term has been a quite useful concept.

I remember telling a bunch of recreation professionals (I used to be one) at a conference talk in the late 80’s to keep their eye on this new notion of “sustainability”. They had not come across this at the time. I said it was going to be the key concept of our modern age. Well I think it has been a very useful one for a time, but may have seen its day. There is something out there, I don’t have a clue what it is, that is deeper with more life power that will supplant sustainability as an idea form to catalyze a generation. Bring it on. Religion, oh sheesh, that would take a few more pages.

I am launching a group to develop a physical space, A Resonance Institute - for research, workshops and concerts. The vision behind it is: Where science, art, earth and spirit meet for direct experiences of resonance as a way of life

If I had one, I guess the above would my religion. I hope lots of amazing people join me.

* * * * *

Chapter 4. The New Green Hero

The Hero's Journey has 12 stages. They are:

1. Ordinary World - The hero's normal world before the story begins
2. Call to Adventure - The hero is presented with a problem, challenge or adventure
3. Refusal of the Call - The hero refuses the challenge or journey, usually because he's scared
4. Meeting with the Mentor - The hero meets a mentor to gain advice or training for the adventure
5. Crossing the First Threshold - The hero crosses leaves the ordinary world and goes into the special world
6. Tests, Allies, Enemies - The hero faces tests, meets allies, confronts enemies & learn the rules of the Special World.
7. Approach - The hero has hit setbacks during tests & may need to try a new idea
8. Ordeal - The biggest life or death crisis
9. Reward - The hero has survived death, overcomes his fear and now earns the reward
10. The Road Back - The hero must return to the Ordinary World.
11. Resurrection Hero - another test where the hero faces death – he has to use everything he's learned
12. Return with Elixir - The hero returns from the journey with the “elixir”, and uses it to help everyone in the Ordinary World

Are you a hero? Who are your Heroes? Who are the people taking a Journey?

What can the PlanetShifter.com Event Circle Interviews tell us about the heroes of the Sustainability Age?

The Thought Leaders Define the Hero:

  • One who listens to an inner voice
  • A hero can seem like a selfish person on the outside
  • A true hero sacrifices the parts of themselves that betray their intuition
  • A hero keeps growing, seeking to improve themselves, giving their gifts, and helping the world and their communities
  • Champions that rescue us from peril that we could not have escaped otherwise
  • Heroes are role models
  • They conquer fear and as a result transcends commonly accepted limitations
  • Hero restores and promotes hope and often helps generations to integrate loftier concepts and desired ideals
  • They speak the truth, and follow their dreams
  • Heroes take responsibility for her thoughts, actions and words, and admit when they could have done or said something differently
  • They are prepared to act selflessly for others
  • There is power both in the art, and being in service – in this (heroic) intersection

Seek the Soul and Trace the Path
Notice that many Heroes do not fit neatly into any of the categories:

Politicians:
Bobby Kennedy
Gandhi
MLK, Jr.

Activists:
Anita Roddick
Wangari Maathai
Jesus of Nazareth
Ed Begley
Laurie David

Scientists:
Ada Lovelace
Jean Jacques Cousteau
Nicola Tesla

Jan Gudman-Høyer
Global Ecovillage Network: Robert Gilman, Albert Bates, Max Lindegger, Hildur and Ross Jackson
Andy Lipkus of Tree People

Artists / Writers:
Desmond Morris
Marc Bolan
Joseph Campbell
David Byrne
Carl Sagan
David Bowie
Salvador Dali
Beatles
Stones
Rimbaud
Mervyn Peake
CS Llewis
JRR Tolkien
Gustav Klimpt
Neil Young
John Lennon
Malcolm Gladwell
Peter Gabriel
Andy Goldsworthy
Brian Swimme
Allaudin Mathieu
Ken Wilber

Be Your Own Hero.

* * * * *

Source Material from the Event Circle Series, PlanetShifter.com:

My idea of a hero is someone whose actions are not based on following what is necessarily expected of them by friends/family/society and even themselves, but based on listening to an inner voice that is greater than their own idle chatter. I think that a hero can seem like a selfish person on the outside, but the truth is quite the opposite, because they allow themselves to be moved by the divine. A true hero sacrifices the parts of themselves that betray their intuition. A friend of mine calls this being a "human robot." You would think that this has negative connotations but it doesn't, it simply means that you hear the commands of your authentic self and you DO. No questioning, only trust. Am I a hero? On the best of days I think that I am. And on the worst, my robot self is still tinkering with ways to get rid of the old programming.

Interview with Dréa Drury

In the communities movement, my heroes are Robert Gilman, Albert Bates, Max Lindegger, Hildur and Ross Jackson, and the other cofounders of the global ecovillage movement and GEN (Global Ecovillage Network) back in the early 1990s; Penelope Reyes, one of the founders of Pintig Ecovillage in the Philippines; Jan Gudman-Høyer, the architect who developed the cohousing concept in Denmark; and Charles Durrett and Kathryn McCammant, who brought cohousing to North America with their 1996 book, Cohousing.

Interview with the Community Builder: Diana Leafe Christian

There are many people that I admire, too many to list! In general, I value people who keep growing, seeking to improve themselves, giving their gifts, and helping the world and their communities. When we all do that, we can all blossom and support the blossoming of others.

Interview with Writer, Public Speaker, and Community Educator Patricia Dines

Heroes are the champions that rescue us from peril that we could not have escaped otherwise. Some people have heroes, but I suspect many more people have role models instead. Heroes tend to be idolized, whereas role models provide examples to live a fulfilled life. My role models include Desmond Morris, Joseph Campbell, Jesus of Nazareth, David Byrne, Carl Sagan, and many, many others. To my knowledge I am not a hero to anyone, though I try to constantly be a role model to others.

Interview Two with Jacob Haqq-Misra

DIVINA:
To me a hero is somebody that conquers fear and as a result transcends commonly accepted limitations. A hero restores and promotes hope and often helps generations to integrate loftier concepts and desired ideals. I do have a hero in me, and I am working on being one in every aspect of my life / of myself. I am conquering myself, so yes, I am my hero.

DOUGLAS:
Divina is my hero. She speaks her truth, and follows her dreams. She challenges herself to be the best she can be. She takes responsibility for her thoughts, actions and words, and will admit when she could have done or said something differently. She doesn’t hide from herself or anyone else. She helps me to be a better man. She traveled from her home country to another continent with confidence and grace, learning the language and creating her own business. Every moment with her is an inspiration, and for that and many more reasons, Divina is my hero.

Last year, I saved a woman’s life at an antique store. I opened her airway and allowed her to breathe. Had I left her as she was, she would have died. I went out of my way to train to know what to do. That’s always been important to me, to be prepared to act in any given situation. To know what to do. That is a clear example of “knowledge is power”. I’ve been a Wilderness First Responder, trained for Search & Rescue. That day, I walked away nameless and unthanked. I think that’s a pretty classic use of the word hero that gets overlooked. I’ve helped a lot of animals throughout my life. In that sense, I’ve been a hero, but I don’t think that makes me a hero now. I’m definitely prepared to be a hero again. That’s as simple as being prepared to act selflessly for another, or knowing CPR.

Interview with Divina Klein and Douglas Mackar of La Forza

My parents, definitely. Also, my two sons. Everyday I learn how to be a better father, friend and all-around person by being around them. My wife has been incredibly supportive throughout this whole journey and in many cases she is greener than I. Outside of my family, I grew up a huge Lakers fan (still am) and was amazed at what Magic Johnson could do. I am a student of Gandhi and love to read and learn about people that have made making a difference a priority.

Interview with Rajeev Kapur, Chief Wala, GreenWala.com

I have a lot of green heroes. The green area is full of notable and respectable individuals. Among them, Wangari Mathai, who won a Nobel Peace Prize for her work in planting trees in Africa and for breaking the forestry devastation. Andy Lipkus of Tree People for his urban forestry and early work in the environmental movement in Los Angeles. Ed Begley, for his eco-commitment, his humor and for using his background as an actor to get Hollywood involved. Laurie David for her activism in getting the 'Inconvenient Truth' on the big screen and for creating a website that has been very instrumental in raising political awareness. Bobby Kennedy for championing the need to keep our waterways clean and fish healthy....I could go on.

Interview with Gay Browne, Founder of Greenopia.com

Heroes: humans whose accomplishments inspire. I think of Ada Lovelace, the world’s first programmer, Nicola Tesla who gave us transportable electricity and celebrated eccentricity, John Lennon who believed in love. Am I hero? Not yet.
Interview with PlanetShifter.com Drupal engineer and San Francisco Musician / Artist / Writer Cheth Rowe

Anita Roddick for trying something new and ethical at a stage when no one talked sustainability, climate change and so on. That is true leadership and vision. Jean Jacques Cousteau has been a big inspiration for me since I was a child. I am French and used to watch all his programmes. His passion for the environment and especially for the marine life was tantalizing and palpable even from the screen. A true hero in my eyes.
Interview with Hessia Fernandes, Co-Founder, Cooltribe

my artistic musical n literary heros were
marc bolan david bowie salvador dali beatles stones dylan rimbaud
mervyn peake cs lewis jrr tolkien gustav klimpt neil young

i am probably someones musical hero yes
to myself i'm just an old craftsman whos been doing it a while

Interview with Steve Kilbey, painter, father and songleader of The Church

I believe all of us are the heroes of our own Journey. But it is important to remember that the journey itself is not complete until the Hero returns home to his or her community and delivers the gift or “boon” as Campbell termed it, to the community. The Hero doesn’t always live long enough to make the return. I have not as yet delivered my ‘boon’ but am working on it!

Interview with Ginger Grant, PhD., Managing Partner: Creativity in Business Canada Inc.

Gandhi, Israel Salanter, and anyone who takes the next small step to make a difference.
Interview with Joe Laur, Senior Manager, Greenopolis.com

Any being who is acting from a place of deep listening and compassion is a hero/ine to me. Service to the whole, coming from a place of knowing oneself as a true expression of the whole, is heroic. It’s also heroic to fail over and over again to act in this way, but continue to find one’s way back to this place of awareness of the possibility of acting from true nature. Actually, that’s more heroic than being that way all the time! Am I a heroine, given this definition? Absolutely! I’m constantly falling off the horse and getting back on. My horse and I do a great dance together.

Interview with Berkeley performance artist and body healer Francesca Genco

For me a hero is someone who is so deeply in service that whatever his or her form of work or creativity is, it comes from that place. There is power both in the art, and being in service - this intersection. A hero has an obvious awareness of the larger picture. Malcolm Gladwell is a hero of mine. Peter Gabriel another. Andy Goldsworthy in a different way. Brian Swimme, Allaudin Mathieu, Ken Wilber, my wife Nika.

I really hope I am a hero for some in the world, and I want them to be hero’s for others who become hero’s for others. Its like when l learned about my “default intention” (what is the core intention driving ones actions in the world?) from another hero of mine, Anurag Gupta, of The Difference Engine business group?) It is often hidden from us. Turns out it was “Do the right thing for safety, or just for its own sake”. 50 years of this dissolved away as I became aware of it and he then had me develop my “sourceful intention” as a new way of being, in its place. Source is his term for the great mystery, god, the essence of existence. Over time my “sourceful intention” evolved to, “Leave’em lit up . . to their own light .. . as Source itself, to light up others”

That’s a long roundabout to the beginning thought about hoping for hero’s who become hero’s who become hero’s for others in a ever widening spiral. Or it could be viewed as a mobius strip reconnecting back on itself as an energy form in the world.

Interview with Composer Alan Tower - Founder of Green Music Network

Wow, that's a loaded question! Um, I suppose so. Sure. Why not? I believe that anyone who has the courage to discover their own unique talents and use with an intention to be of service to others is a hero. We are all heroes...at various stages of unfolding.

Having said that, I'm excited to become a much better hero moving forward, like MLK, Jr. He's my hero. I'd love to be able to do what he did (but hopefully without the marital infidelities and assassination part).

Interview with author and change agent John Marshall Roberts

* * * * *

Chapter 5. Survival of the Greenest?

"Survival of the Greenest?" GreenSource Knowledge Paper Series #5

From the ongoing Event Circle Interviews at PlanetShifter.com

Introduction:
Chapters from LAO from GreenLoc, CA - A Story for Our Youth by Willi Paul (2009)

*VI*

There are plenty of other coops and non-profits in the GreenLoc business array. In addition to the food and garden coop, there is the jam, flowers and honey coop; fruit trees and bees, dig? Another key group in this time of scarce water is the Grey Water Company who designs and implements water re-use projects for the area. Students from UC – Davis took over the old water works company in 2011 in a bloodless coup when the rains stopped and the CEO ran off for moister land.

The schools and spirituality coop is flourishing. It's taken a little bit from most of the religions puttering around on the planet. A sort of greatest hits from the heavy hitters, including Jesus, Gandhi, King, Yogananda, Buddha and Allah.

But the kids and their parents also enjoy song prophets like Lennon, Marley, Stipe, Hitchcock and other rock musicians who sang about the fall and the re-birth of post-carbon culture long before the tanker hit the can.

The love of music – and the community spirit it fosters - has often been the one lasting source of strength in the trouble times.

*X.*

What happened to the Bank? The old NorCal Savings and Loan is now the School for a Sustainable Future and Day Care Coop.
At the new Credits and Barter Coop, debit cards have been replaced by barter cards. Cash, loans and credit lines are pitch forks from the BlackLight mob.

Bricks and mortar have now morphed into handshakes, vegetables for home remodeling. Dig? Piper and his pals are getting the word out for the next barter faire - this time with a discount barter pass on recycled card stock. They will hand drop the invite via bikes to the community. Sometimes offline announcements get more peeps.

A barter faire (or fair) is a communal experience. It is a peaceful gathering of people coming together to share the fire and their wares and trade with each other. Some are more like flea markets, some are more like villages. A barter faire is a time to get back to nature, camp out with friends, and experience the best of the barter system. It can feel like a counter culture revival; or just a simple and peaceful gathering open to all. A barter faire will give you a taste of a communal, peaceful, and possibly revolutionary lifestyle that you may not find elsewhere.

"Hey Green Man, its Piper on the text box."

"Must be about that hot tub gig," Taza shouted.

"Ask him about the south array data set ok?"

Banana in mouth, he quickly text Piper back and kissed his groovy girlfriend on the cheek and hit the pedals.

"I need to check the energy grid and see how much fun heat we can drop," he mumbled.

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

We asked our thought leaders about their concerns for the future and how life and basic values might change on the planet. Key points include:

  • What I see in the next 2-5 years is a worldwide restructuring of the perception of time, a major collapse of fear, and a catastrophic period of angry and hungry people overcoming their limited personalities to be one with their unlimited god-selves
  • The big shift starts within as awareness of the corruption of our entire Consumer Culture, military industrial complex, entertainment corporations, failed educational system, morally bankrupt economy…the whole syndrome of unwise structures that are actually collapsing all around us right now. The new paradigm must be grounded in genuine empathy for the sanctity of all living beings
  • Goals: Be more thrifty, self-reliant, and conservative in one's use of resources
  • Learning to live sustainably or equitably in a steady-state or even a contracting economy - need to be more self-reliant
  • Need to shape our own regional conditions, especially concerning energy and food production and distribution
  • We are in a hybrid period , transitioning out of years of indifference and selfishness into a time of understanding the world we live in, and finding our rightful place in it
  • Make profit the secondary parameter
  • Catastrophic events may shake governments and cause instabilities in many vulnerable regions around the world
  • The greater good is a building block of many small positive movements
  • The world will have the infrastructure needed for the greater change
  • The existing system of suppression and abuse will collapse and a new world to come forth
  • Mother Nature needs a lot of cleansing
  • Collapse and destruction are not necessary
  • What seems to be happening is that the companies who “do the right thing” are succeeding and companies whose driving force is purely greed and profit are failing. Evolution at its best supports green business by selling re-usable items and re-use means jobs
  • The Tower and the Devil have already afflicted Earth. If there is something more coming, the cards in the fortune teller’s deck probably don’t go far enough
  • Previous periods of sunspot disappearance have been marked by unusually cold temperatures. The Maunder Minimum, from 1645 to 1715, was known as the Little Ice Age. The lesson here is that the actual dangers we face are seldom the ones we plan for.
  • Our personal investments in cleaner technologies and less consumptive living and the outcome of the current health debate are going to have a huge impact
  • The shift is a mental attitude towards the condition of the planet and the action that needs to be taken. Now, for me the most difficult item during this mental transition is not necessarily the economy, although this is critical, but the shift from linear thinking over to integral thinking. There will be those in society that will choose resist
  • Businesses will be operating differently, for example reducing energy wastage and incorporating new technologies in packaging that allow them to reduce the amount of materials used as well as reusing recycled resource to help close the loop. New products will also be developed thanks to up-cycled innovations
  • We need to reconstruct how we view race relations (on Bermuda) from collecting statistics based on skin color and shift towards looking at race from a socio-economic perspective and look at how people are surviving economically and socially (i.e., education, spiritually, family, culturally)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

GreenSource Knowledge Paper Series #5 Source Material

In some ways, aspiring to be thrifty, self-reliant, and conservative in one's use of resources are quintessentially American traits that have a time-honored tradition in our nation's history. It was only in the post-World War II period that these values were almost thoroughly cast aside in favor of a kind of live-for-today, me-first consumerism.

That said, we've strayed so far from being a self-reliant and sustainable economy – especially since the early 1970s when the US peaked in its own domestic oil production – that economic localization now amounts to a radical paradigm shift in our thinking. You can see in the debates that are going on nationally and internationally about "resuscitating" our collapsing economy that the only thinkable strategy is "stimulating" our economy in order to get the global consumer growth-fest back on track. No one in high office within the major industrialized economies is talking about learning to live sustainably or equitably in a steady-state or even a contracting economy -- much less in one that relies less and less on the shipping of fossil fuel-based good half-way across the globe. But that's the kind of shift we must begin to accept, prepare for, and shape to our own regional conditions if we ever hope to thrive within the post-petroleum economy that's coming.

Aaron Lehmer Interview

We are in a hybrid period. Out of necessity (climate change, growing environmental awareness, global financial meltdown, compromised health, increasingly expensive health care, etc.) humanity is transitioning out of years of indifference and selfishness into a time of understanding the world we live in, and finding our rightful place in it.

Interview with Linda Delair

(A) Well, I would like to think more positive and hope that in the upcoming year the economy would start its slow rebound, as for the period of anger and hunger, this is not something new, not to be ignored but not new. Throughout every decade the world has faced these extreme challenges. My hope is that we have grown enough where we can start taking into consideration these events in our business decisions, where corporations can add people into their decision making. And I am not referring to only adding this human equation only in their marketing campaigns, but to put that where it really counts - bottom line. Make profit the secondary parameter. We all can hope, right?

As I said I would like to hope that we, human race, as short term residents of this planet have matured. I would like to be more hopeful and see that we would start taking the steps necessary to protect our planet.

(Z) I sure hope not, but I think the world is heading into a period of great uncertainties driven not only by the unneeded wars and the collapse of economy but also by the major climate changes. Catastrophic events may shake governments and cause instabilities in many vulnerable regions around the world. Unfortunately, I also think that people who will suffer the most are probably not the ones spending their time online right now. I do not believe that the greater good happens all at once, it is a building block of many small positive movements. So if all of us who are capable of a positive contribution began implementing progressive ideas today, I’m certain that when time comes, the world will have the infrastructure needed for the greater change.

Interview with Favorpal.com's Founders Amir Razmara and Zeo Solomon

DIVINA:
Some call it "The Last Waltz of the Tyrants", and I believe that there is multiple parallel realities, and that we personally choose more or less consciously which one we are to experience. I wish to see the existing system of suppression and abuse to collapse and a new world to come forth. Also Mother Nature needs a lot of cleansing, and yes, I believe that that involves some destruction, how much, I don't know. However, if you are aligned with nature, it will preserve you.

DOUGLAS:
If enough people envision a major collapse, catastrophes, anger, and hunger, then of course it must come to pass. I think a lot of people want that, because their view of reality is that something must be torn down in order to build something new; that destruction must come before creation. That mind set can be seen in healing one’s own body. The “western” idea of removing organs that do not function properly is counter to traditional Chinese medicine that shows clearly that the effects of the disease in that organ will simply move on to the next organ in the pentagram of the elements. Collapse and destruction are not necessary, just as removing the failed organ is not necessary. To truly heal, either a body or a society, one must enter a mind state of absolute health. The cells in your body are controlled by your mind. They respond appropriately to your thoughts. Nothing happens to you, only through you.

Regardless of the events that happen throughout the world, I will continue to transform myself into the unlimited being that I have always been. When I have mastered myself, then the whole world will be a reflection of my sweetest dreams. What I see in the next 2-5 years is a worldwide restructuring of the perception of time, a major collapse of fear, and a catastrophic period of angry and hungry people overcoming their limited personalities to be one with their unlimited god-selves.

Interview with Divina Klein and Douglas Mackar of La Forza

We aren’t quite as pessimistic about the future of the world economy and disposition. In fact, I actually believe that the “minor” collapse of the world economy that we have seen over the past year is forcing business to be kinder and more sincere to their customers. In the U.S. it is also stabilizing prices which were formerly based on what people would pay for a product rather than what it was worth. So what seems to be happening is that the companies who “do the right thing” are succeeding and companies whose driving force is purely greed and profit are failing. Evolution at it’s best!

Interview with Jennie Redwine of The Colorado Yurt Company

Yes, about 35 million Americans regularly buy green products, according to research group Mintel. The target demographic for green marketing represents 66 percent of all US adults and more than 80 percent of consumers believe it's important to buy from green companies. Goodwill supports green business by selling re-usable items and re-use means jobs.

Interview with Lauren Lawson, Media Relations Manager with Goodwill Industries International

Prognostication is ever-popular, especially the doomsday kind. George Orwell’s 1984, computer date failures at 2000, Clarke’s 2001, and the soon upon us Mayan long count rollover on December 21, 2012 have all spawned copious texts full of millennial dread and warnings. I can read Tarot cards, tea leaves, and cast the I Ching; they will entertain, and may tell me something. But the Tower and the Devil have already afflicted Earth. If there is something more coming, the cards in the fortune teller’s deck probably don’t go far enough.

Strangely, I’m optimistic. I believe Man will survive.

Money won’t be the biggest problem. It may not be global warming either. I’m struck by the fact that the sun has gone lame. It’s lost its spots. Sunspots are at a hundred year low, and show no clear sign of returning. As a consequence, and somewhat paradoxically, the sun’s is radiating less heat. Previous periods of sunspot disappearance have been marked by unusually cold temperatures. The Maunder Minimum, from 1645 to 1715, was known as the Little Ice Age. The lesson here is that the actual dangers we face are seldom the ones we plan for.

Interview with PlanetShifter.com Drupal engineer Cheth Rowe

I tend not to focus on the doomsday scenarios. I strongly believe in the power of the free market to make adjustments based on new information. I see EcoLogo standards and certification as a way of bringing environmental factors into consumer decision-making. As new information is introduced about the hidden human health, environmental, and social impacts of purchasing decisions, consumers will shift behavior and reward those companies that are addressing the biggest global issues while continuing to provide consumers with immediate value.

Interview with Scot Case, VP, TerraChoice

Haven't you heard? Green jobs are all the rage. I think the green jobs movement is a powerful one - lifting people out of poverty while moving our economy toward environmentally sound investments and practices. This creates a ripple effect of positive change that will lead to cleaner, healthier communities that empower previously disadvantaged groups. I think our personal investments in cleaner technologies and less consumptive living and the outcome of the current health debate are going to have a huge impact.

5 Questions for Inna Leavitt

Well, I do believe there is definitely a role for the Latino-Indigenous people to play in the days to come and have done so already. Just like hip hop has been such an incredible voice for young people in helping shape the consciousness of society for better or for worse, there is also an indigenous influence that once again has not been recognized.

Just take a look at public transportation. It is full of people of color and specifically Latinos who are already doing their part in cutting down the carbon footprint. Day laborers ride their bicycles to and from work if and when they are lucky to get it. Remember, our grandmothers recycled jelly jars for drinking glasses instead of buying new ones. So the so called “Latino” contribution which to a massive extent is Native, has already had a tremendous influence in U.S. culture. I believe the numbers of Southern people in the U.S. cannot be ignored any longer. They will play a pivotal role at both the grassroots level and the international level in what will be done to improve the condition of the Earth.

The “shift” that your asking about is really a shift that the elders throughout “Indian country” as we say, have known for hundreds of years. Look at the Hopi and Maya prophesies. They knew to exactly the time when this so called technological phase of human development was to take place. They have also known that there is a mental shift that is to take place. This shift is a mental attitude towards the condition of the planet and the action that needs to be taken. Now, for me the most difficult item during this mental transition is not necessarily the economy, although this is critical, but the shift from linear thinking over to integral thinking. There will be those in society that will choose resist. Their education perhaps is so linear and closed that they will choose not to recognize of all the contributions our elders have made to humanity as a whole. This in turn sets them up be even more closed and unwilling to work together to help our planet. They will surely suffer in isolation. So to reiterate this is indigenous values system thinking. This is nothing new to us.

Interview with David Ecobar, leader of Viviendo Verde and Viviendo Verde Ya!

We are currently experiencing a major industrial revolution and social evolution that is focused on changing habits and processes that have become second nature to society. However, the power of social media and influential characters such as Franny Armstrong, (director of Age of Stupid) are raising the profile of the issues that need addressing and are empowering individuals to contribute in in their own way. Learning is everything at the moment and there is still lots to do in influencing public perception, supporting the enthusiastic and encouraging governments to have the strength of conviction to make the changes needed.

The face of "Green" is changing at a significant rate and in five years time, I believe that what would have once been considered fringe habits and attitudes will be integrated into mainstream lifestyles. Businesses will be operating differently, for example reducing energy wastage and incorporating new technologies in packaging that allow them to reduce the amount of materials used as well as reusing recycled resource to help close the loop. New products will also be developed thanks to upcycled innovations. We have companies such as TerraCycle to thank for that. Globalism will still exist, but local production will be valued more greatly, with an increasing number of people growing their own food.

Interview with UK’s Karen Cannard

I believe that this administration is committed to moving the United States in a leadership position when it comes to combating climate change and I look forward to seeing the manifestation of that in December at Copenhagen. The economic situation is something that will take longer to straighten out and that will require concessions on all parts.

Five Questions for Anca Novacovici - Eco-Coach, Inc

Change is certain and the opportunity to form wiser multicultural contexts is at hand. Every motive is being activated, from fear to green greed. But the one I value most is what I’ve been calling our ETHICAL IMAGINATION. That force for good is something we all have within, and it’s the ultimate energy for making a better world.

The big shift starts within as awareness of the corruption of our entire Consumer Culture, military industrial complex, entertainment corporations, failed educational system, morally bankrupt economy…the whole syndrome of unwise structures that are actually collapsing all around us right now. The new paradigm must be grounded in genuine empathy for the sanctity of all living beings. The intrinsic worth of every being can be perceived. Heaven is all around us, but we are blinded to its presence by ideas that imprison our minds into patterns that have no heart or soulfulness.

Interview with Allen Green, of Allen Green Planning

Well, our slogan is ‘changing the mindset’ so Greenrock acts as a catalyst for creating paradigm shifts in Bermuda. I think in some sense the top 3 challenges are noted in question #2. If you needed a fourth, I would say that we need to reconstruct how we view race relations on the island from collecting statistics based on skin color and shift towards looking at race from a socio-economic perspective and look at how people are surviving economically and socially (i.e., education, spiritually, family, culturally).

Interview with Andrew Vaucrosson, President of Greenrock.org

* * * * *

Chapter 6. The Shaman in Our Musical Universe

“The Shaman in Our Musical Universe:” GreenSource Knowledge Paper #6. Based on the Event Circle Interviews on PlanetShifter.com by Willi Paul

About the image

Introduction

The shaman, or medicine man, or healer, or Buddha, is an ancient title and. community role, a hero and teacher common to many world people and their myths. Are there shamans with guitars today? Some artists feel that this role is possible, that the rock show is more than a performance. Some feel that they are evoking and/or invoking something through their work and live gigs.

See a larger picture: the reservoir: rock music and mythology

Discussion Points:

  • One who seeks after spiritual knowledge
  • Uses psychedelic drugs?
  • A protector of a divine mystery for the sake of a community
  • Shamans experience the trance state
  • Healings are almost always instantaneous. Shaman’s treat time differently than we do
  • It’s evolution, baby!
  • Shaman’s are the most humble, heart centered people
  • They channel the secretive spirits
  • As a shaman, I am a shrewd and intelligent manipulator of ideas n techniques
  • We are attempting to invoke something from part of our minds and then again on tape
  • I’m doing something on behalf of the audience, but I’m not just sure what it is; something is activated
  • I would rather that the audience feel like they are contributing to the show and not being taken over

Source Material: Selected PlanetShifter.com Event Circle Interviews

If a Shaman is one who seeks after spiritual knowledge, then I could be counted as one. That said, I never apply the title of Shaman to myself. Many people interested in psychedelic substances will validate their experiments by pointing to tribal shaman leaders who also used psychedelic drugs. I think this comparison is often misguided, though, for the tribal shaman was probably the only member of the entire tribe privileged to commune with the divine in this way.

Indeed, I'd be willing to venture that the societal structure of tribes based around psychoactive plants resulted as a need to keep the power of the plants from abuse by the common folk. A shaman who carefully prepares to enter the unknown can then take the mysterious knowledge of the plant drug and pass it on in a useful form to the rest of the tribe. In today's culture, though, we assert that everyone can be a shaman. I agree that everyone can (and should) explore their own spirituality, but I would consider a shaman to be a protector of a divine mystery for the sake of a community.

Interview Two with Jacob Haqq-Misra

DIVINA:
By working on consciously using different parts of our brains that allow us to be psychic and powerful, and by working on accepting other dimensions and the invisible to be as real as the world we can perceive through our five senses.

DOUGLAS:
The most basic aspect of how we are Shamans is the experience of the trance state.
All creation occurs in a trance state. In trance, your old attitudes can’t disrupt creation and evolution. It’s only when you release from that trance state that you fall back into your old mind state. It’s always a temptation to go back to the familiar. True change- transformation- is incorporating new knowledge into your psyche and holding it there long enough for it to become a permanent part of your thinking.

Remember, Shamanic healings are almost always instantaneous. They treat time differently than we do. The old program must be replaced. That is what Shamans do. That is what instantaneous healing is. Replacing the old program with something new. And you can repeat this process indefinitely. That is evolution.

Interview with Divina Klein and Douglas Mackar of La Forza

It is more of a feeling. Most Shaman's I have experienced are the most humble, heart centered people I have met. It is not a role that is accompanied with theatrics and ego.

Interview with Chris Deckker

By programming computers and by performing music I am, in a sense, a shaman, able to communicate with the secretive spirits of good and evil that wiser folk choose to leave alone. It is thrilling to have such power, to wield a well-placed object-oriented overloaded polymorphism—well, thrilling when it works. More often programming efforts fail. It is only by repeatedly trying again and again that programs slowly become usable.

With musical performance it is somewhat different. Failures still occur, but they become part of the product. With live music whatever one does is. It’s too late to make it any more perfect. But it is still the same channeling of the secretive spirits.

Interview with PlanetShifter.com Drupal Cheth Rowe

i wish i was a shaman
i perform pseudo-shamanistic artistic feats sometimes
but in truth i am a shrewd and intelligent manipulator of ideas n techniques
unless i have completely fooled myself
sometimes i get confused where its all coming from
i would hate to have delusions of grandeur
yes and no about the new world
my worlds are alternate worlds
neither newer or older
much like ours but stranger and more improbably probable
i'm trying to represent these other places/other things
because.....
because...
i dont really know
its just what i have been "told" to do

Interview with Steve Kilbey

No. From my reading, there seems to be an historic connection between drumming and shamanism, but I don’t think of myself in this way. Not on a stage. A shaman is usually someone who has gone through a wrenching life experience that evokes a spirit, and comes back to to the community to heal and counsel. This hasn’t happened to me. I’m a mixing console shaman! We are attempting to invoke something of course, but we’re not animists, we don’t give it a name. We don’t (leave) offerings out. But we’re certainly attempting to invoke something from part of our minds and then again on tape. Then we know we have the mix correct. We’re done our “bogus shaman thing.”

“Lucid Dreams, Sonic Cocoon: Interview with Steve Tibbetts and Marc Anderson”.

Jim Morrison thought of himself as one. He wrote a song called “Shaman’s Blues.” Ya, (all musicians) are. The guy in the pub, Prince. All performers are likely invoking something. It’s not just “us and them,” you know? I’m doing something on behalf of the audience, but I’m not just sure what it is. Something is activated. It’s not just a freak show. But to be a focal point for a crowd is a big responsibility (and scary). And I don’t really know what to do with it afterwards.

“Balloon Man, Queen Elvis, and the Bath Tub Boys.”Interview with Robyn Hitchcock.

Yes, I’ve thought about this. I think that many people embrace this idea, but I don’t like something that causes the audience to lose a sense of their personal identity. I like it when people get as excited as they possibly can, but I would rather that the audience feel like they are contributing to the show and not being taken over. I resist this shaman or high priest role. I’d rather be a leader to self-discovery than a controller of minds.

”Harvard’s Own Talking Head: Jerry Harrison” . Interview by Willi Paul.

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Chapter 7. Green Symbols and Myth Making

Green Symbols and Myth Making in the Sustainability Age
Please see my initial thoughts and Illustration.

Introduction:

Sustainability is our consciousness changing, global healing design that started with the land conservation movement of John Muir, the Boy Scout Ecology badge and continues today with Al Gore’s gut shocking “An Incontinent Truth.” To understand environmental or social sustainability, you need to read the stories of the tree sitters and the signs of protest held high by your soccer Moms. Many of these struggles for saner land development and a toxic-free neighborhood are based on new green universal visions that are transmitted and cultivated by one culture and then transmitted world-wide via the Internet.

The mythology of sustainability, unlike other mythic systems, has an electronic, mediated backbone. Not in My Backyard (NIMB) is now Not on My Earth (NOME) – on YouTube.com. Sustainability is fueling a shift in global consciousness and demanding a new set of fears and songs and stories that could be just what the electro-shaman ordered. Indeed, the practice of sustainability could be seen as quasi-religious to many. Why? Because so many have ditched their birth rite religions and have nothing else to substitute for the Sunday mass. Or because protecting Mother Nature is now a priority of grand proportion and we struggle to blend and create a hybrid of Wicca and Quakerism to fuel a new set of global spiritual rites of initiations, traditions and holy passage.

Exploration Points:

  • One's product choices become important representations of sustainability rather than adherence to an ill defined aesthetic green symbology. Dr. Bronner's is the new old green
  • ‘water memorizing’ for recalling our memories, ‘water purifying’ in relation with the present water condition , ‘water rejuvenating’ for the future
  • Most of environmental artists look as if they are spinning a ‘thread of time’ toward an ecologically sustainable future
  • Seek a new found appreciation for painting and connections to visionary kin
  • One could extrapolate symbols and mythology from much of my art, so feel free to play this game as you gaze through each active portal of imagination
  • We need to step out of the mass consumption paradigm of useless junk, into a new holistic one that is more sustainable for all life.; find an evolving consciousness
  • Build shared resources, cooperative decision-making and participatory self-governance, ecological sustainability, local food self-reliance, and a local economy
  • Quoting the Symposium: “Environmental sustainability, spiritual fulfillment, and social justice, rather than being separate issues, are actually three interrelated facets of one profoundly interconnected whole”
  • Staying present with the gifts I’m crafting and the conversations that I’m nurturing. I hope that, through this process, my ideas and information can serve humanity
  • We have the power to change our reality if we first have a dream, or vision or even intention
  • The ancient sources will be synthesized with new insights; biomimcry is a great example
  • A myth is a vehicle for communicating an idea without any regard to its historicity, plausibility, predictability, or factual truth; David & Goliath, King Arthur, the Big Bang, and the Industrial Revolution are all mythological because they are all stories that address the purpose and meaning of human life
  • I like to be inspired by stories, but not confined by them
  • Whenever there is an agenda by one group of people, the writings or stories of another group will be referred to as myth
  • I think our main symbol is our brand and the five claw marks. It truly means that we can all do our bit for the environment and leave a more natural legacy behind us

GreenSource Knowledge Paper #7 - Source Material from Event Circle Interviews:

There isn't really an easy answer to this question. Sure, green is the color of the movement, but as it has come closer to ubiquity, green means less and less as it has been co-opted for marketing and 'greenwashing'. There are plenty of symbols, from tree and leaves to globes, that readily signify sustainability, but there doesn’t seem to be a rule about it. Most of this imagery is marketing/branding driven. Consumers are sophisticated enough to recognize the branding style associated with green products. With sustainable lifestyle choices beyond marketing, for authentic lifestyle behavior, there are all sorts of coded actions, products, activities and language that signify differentiation. Just thinking about this idea as it relates to my life, I wonder about my own choices. Do I drive a Volkswagen diesel as a signifier of my green status or have a selected this vehicle because it allows me to run it on bio (plus it's fun to drive)? Actually, I think for most of us green-minded people, we make these product and lifestyle decisions out of an authentic desire to make good choices and when enough green conscious people arrive at similar conclusions, choices become a trend which becomes a signifier. I have to admit that I feel troubled when I visit a friend's house and I notice that they have bottled water, the food isn't locally sourced, or the toilet paper isn't recycled. It seems to me that consumer purchases are strong indicators of individual commitment to sustainable living, so it makes perfect sense to me that one's product choices become important representations of sustainability rather than adherence to an ill defined aesthetic green symbology. Dr. Bronner's is the new old green.

Tim Gaudreau Interview

I have been trying to recall our memories of places through water which has been circulating all over the earth, and at the same time, I have tried to draw our attention to the fact that our body has been also letting in and out water for so many generations. Hoping to close up the story of ecology originating from deep relations between human life and surrounding environment, I start to search for ‘inherency and commonality’ hidden in places and plan about how to unite ‘past-present-future’. We must notice that what’s called ‘water’ is an assembly of various water flows; that is, ‘water memorizing’ for recalling our memories, ‘water purifying’ in relation with the present water condition , ‘water rejuvenating’ for the future etc. Most of environmental artists look as if they are spinning a ‘thread of time’ toward an ecologically sustainable future.

Interview with Ichi Ikeda

I don't know if I'm creating 'new' symbols, or fresh icons, never mapped before. I do feel that I'm part of an evolving consciousness that is unfolding and showing itself through certain archetypes in visual and sonic media. Though to say they have never been mapped before could be an overstatement. I think the media and tools we are using now, are offering a new type of reflection of an energy that has always been present and manifest throughout human history.

The symbols we are playing with now seem to play a role in connecting those people whose paths fit in a certain way for the benefit of our own unfolding, while sharing this story with those who partake in the interaction of viewing. I suppose one piece I could reference with obvious symbols, would be one I did back in the fall of 2004, during the first year of my new found appreciation for painting, and connections to my visionary kin. This is the painting Synergenesis. It was created then from the inspiration of an event taking place in San Francisco called "Synergenesis", which was aimed at connecting visionary artists and interested viewers, in the exploration of uncovering a world not yet fully manifest, though showing itself through this type of art and media. I couldn't make it to the event, so I stayed home and tapped into that energy and created this piece which has reference to many different symbols, including ones from my dreams, and even representing styles of other artists merging as one. Instead of explaining more, I'll let each viewer muse on what they find symbolic to them. Another piece which comes to mind, is My Awakening. This was the second painting I ever made of this type, in the winter of 2004. I was recently reminded of it, because of a near death experience story I just read, in which the person describes their experience in close detail related to a cosmic transfiguration I experienced, that lead to the expression of this painting.

Specifically the high frequency energy, the tunnel with a bright light at the end, a universal grid matrix that connects all life, and eyes as portals into other worlds or dimensions. There was even further detail that was similar, but too much to go into here. The point being that, including people who have done ayahuasca, this piece reflects a real place where others have been, that came out as symbols they can identify with. You can also see some swirling swastikas representative of that endless flowing energy that is identified as a timeless symbol used throughout human history in a positive connotation. (minus the Nazis). I suppose you could extrapolate symbols and mythology from much of my art, so feel free to play this game as you gaze through each active portal of imagination.

I feel that in my many ways I am helping build this mythology or whatever you want to call it. In the past year I focused much on creating tree and forest imagery that was a bridge between the high frequency ethereal energies of past paintings, mixed with a strong connection to Earth or Gaian groundedness. This is part of my own process in reconnecting to the earth, while sharing it so others can see as well. I use 100% recycled PCP paper for my small prints, and try to take other steps in creating art, and a lifestyle that are more harmonious with the earth and her shared inhabitants. This includes eating as much local and organic produce as I can, and in general stepping out of the mass consumption paradigm of useless junk, into a new holistic one that is more sustainable for all life. I do this because it resonates with an evolving consciousness that I feel to be a part of.

Interview with Simon Haiduk

Perhaps all the activists in the intentional communities movement -- and this includes ecovillage activists and cohousing activists -- are creating a new myth, or perhaps a new culture, in which shared resources, cooperative decision-making and participatory self-governance, ecological sustainability, local food self-reliance, and a local economy are the norm. I'd want to live in a world like this!

Interview with Diana Leafe Christian

We are changing our dream by asking ourselves, what kind of unexamined assumptions have been leading us into such dreaded unintended consequences? How is it that we have accepted so much pain and suffering as a means to an end? For example, as a kid, when we would pull into a gas station, and the smell of pumping gas would make me sick, it never occurred to me that that was unacceptable, to poison ourselves, because the end game was the car, which would take us where we wanted to go. Nausea and vomiting were just an unfortunate down side. Burning petroleum, and creating smog so bad that our eyes and lungs burn and we have global smog alert days so bad that people were masks and the young and elderly are forced to stay inside, is madness. Yet, we’ve accepted this for ourselves - what can be done? Well, a lot can be done, and many of us are waking up to that. As I said earlier, we vote with our dollars. We are waking up to that. We are beginning to see we have been using the wrong operating manual, and we are changing that.

Thanks to the internet and the popularity of social networks, it is clear that we enjoy working with and trusting each other, globally, as we create the kind of world which respects, honors and supports life for all the children of all species – there are NO throw away species! This is a big shift away from the nightmare of fear and divisiveness our Western culture has been living, particularly for the last 200 years of the Industrial Revolution. Quoting the Symposium: “Environmental sustainability, spiritual fulfillment, and social justice, rather than being separate issues, are actually three interrelated facets of one profoundly interconnected whole.”

Interview with Linda Delair

Perhaps, but not intentionally. I see myself as giving my offerings to the circle and encouraging others to do the same. I focus first on staying present with the gifts I’m crafting and the conversations that I’m nurturing. I hope that, through that process, my ideas and information can serve humanity in finding a path that highlights the beautiful caring intelligent creatures that we are, at heart.

This isn’t something I’ve really studied. I think that the green movement is as diverse as people are, and when the movement is successful in its task, eco-consciousness will just be integrated into our everyday lives, as it once was. So there will then be many ways that we speak -- and illustrate -- our connection to the earth. It’ll just become normal.

Interview with Patricia Dines

I do think a new mythology is being generated and that it is gaining momentum everyday through the largest unnamed movement the planet has ever seen. I think the more that this movement can recognize itself and come together, despite issue, sector, country, race, then people will increasingly gain hope and power. Very quickly we’ll see that we are in the majority and old power structures will be replaced. Then we can move beyond sustainability, which is about survival, to a vision where we and future generations thrive and grow into our true potential as human beings.

The biggest myth or belief that we’re using is that we have the power to change our personal and collective dream. This is an ancient technology that has been used by indigenous cultures for millennia. This is an empowering myth because it tells us that we are not passive recipients of the destructive dream that is being foisted upon us at every turn. It says that we have the power to change our reality if we first have a dream, or vision or even intention.

Interview with David Tucker

I think the way forward involves a certain amount of rediscovery of ancient and indigenous symbols and stories. Interestingly, much of what scientists are discovering about complex systems is reflected in the wisdom of ancient and indigenous cultures, particularly the profoundly interconnected nature of the world. Linda Booth-Sweeney has done a great job of collecting these stories in her book Connected Wisdom.

But these ancient sources will also be synthesized with new insights. Biomimcry is a great example of this. I think nature provides a lot of potent symbols to inform the way we design human communities. Borrowing from Bill McKibben's Deep Economy, I think the new story is that it's not about More, it's about Better.

Interview with Matt Dubel

A myth is any story that explains any aspect of what it means to be human. A myth is a vehicle for communicating an idea without any regard to its historicity, plausibility, predictability, or factual truth. David & Goliath, King Arthur, the Big Bang, and the Industrial Revolution are all mythological because they are all stories that address the purpose and meaning of human life.

Personally, I find myself returning to the New Testament gospels in terms of a religious text. Through my studies I am steeped in scientific myth, which I find tremendously valuable, and for comic myth I find myself attracted to the South Park animated series these days.

Interview Two with Jacob Haqq-Misra

DIVINA:
To me, a myth is a story that has been told so many times that many, consciously or unconsciously, believe that it is real. I am working on being free of all myths and creating my reality independently of all past and all stories. I like to be inspired by stories, but not confined by them.

DOUGLAS:
Myth is a way to take real events and make them seems as if they never happened, that they are just stories. Is Atlantis a myth? If you study the work of Zecharia Sitchin, you’ll hear the idea that the so-called “myths” of Greece and Rome were actually reworkings of the stories of the Sumerians. I’m sure there are plenty of people today who would like to call the writings of the Sumerians “myths”. Some may think that the writings of modern newspapers are myths. Whenever there is an agenda by one group of people, the writings or stories of another group will be referred to as myth. I like to keep an open mind about all myths. There may be more truth to them than you think. I recommend reading the complete works of Sitchin as soon as possible. They are a fabulous reflection of the world we live in today.

Interview with Divina Klein and Douglas Mackar of La Forza

Greenwala is creating a community. We hope that the Greenwala community becomes the symbol for those wanting to either learn how to be green/greener or want to provide their knowledge to the community and share their expertise.

Interview with Rajeev Kapur

Hopefully, not myths, but an appreciation and recognition for those businesses and services who are going the extra mile to be socially and ecologically responsible for their customers. The mission of our company is to make it easier to shop, eat and live a greener life.

Interview with Gay Browne

This question reminds me of an old saying "Creativity is the art of taking a fresh look at old knowledge". I am just being creative with the ancient tools of music and ceremony, to bring a positive experience for the "tribe".

Interview with Chris Deckker

I think our main symbol is our brand and the five claw marks. It truly means that we can all do our bit for the environment and leave a more natural legacy behind us.

Interview with Hessia Fernandes

Let’ s hope so. We need them desperately. “Waste is food” needs to replace “throw it away”, “Live on solar income” needs to replace “drill baby, drill”!

Interview with Joe Laur

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Chapter 8. The GreenLife Flame

“The GreenLife Flame:” GreenSource Knowledge Paper #8 based on the Event Circle Interviews on PlanetShifter.com

Introduction:

Both in Future Shock and then with much more detail in The Third Wave, we (Alvin and Heidi Toffler) argued that in fact a turn was taking place; that the third wave, while it was technological, was not industrial, and that there's a distinction between these two; and that especially the rise of the computer, but also many other technologies linked together, were giving rise to a new kind of society, or civilization as we call it, that contrasts with the mass society produced by industrial civilization.

It is what we call a de-massified society. It is heterogeneous; it has much more room for diversity. And the computers, rather than suppressing diversity, have in fact made possible and fostered a high degree of diversity, particularly as we shifted from the mainframe to the PC. So you now move from mass production to de-massified production of customized products--small-run production. In parallel, you move toward de-massified micro-markets--boutiques, targeted catalog shopping, etc., as examples. You move toward a more diverse family structure--not everybody's in the nuclear family any more. In fact the working father, stay-at-home mother, with two kids under eighteen- probably represents under 5% of the American population today. Instead of nuclear, we have a wide variety of family forms.

We sometimes summarize the changes in terms of a biological analogy: that society is going through cellular differentiation and a speedup of metabolism at the same time. Then came Powershift, which we published ten years later in 1990. Powershift focused more directly on the implications, particularly the economic implications, but more generally the power implications, of a society in which knowledge has become the central economic resource. It focused a lot on the economy, on business; talked some about the future of the nation-state and of politics; and did a very quick rough sketch of some of the global implications….

The recent book, War and Anti-War, takes as its premise that knowledge stands in a new relationship to economic production. The book looks at the implications of this for both economic power and military power. Knowledge now becomes central to both kinds of power on the planet. Now, what does that mean in terms of conflict, war, peacekeeping, and the global system?”

* * * * * * *

Some GreenLife Options to Consider:

  • Eat less processed foods
  • Build a front-yard garden
  • Experiment in sustainable living with a comprehensive plan
  • Run the car on biodiesel
  • Compost
  • Scale back our actions to what the earth can sustain
  • Create a rain water harvesting for your garden
  • Support Social Justice projects and educate about a specific issue
  • Dumpster dive
  • Shop and barter at the farmers market
  • Reduce our consumption that enables us to remain debt free
  • Use a Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV)
  • Refurbish and distribute computers to residents currently lacking computer access at home, thus helping to close the digital divide
  • Divert used computers and computer equipment from landfills
  • Promote localism
  • Make furniture from trash
  • Save regional ecosystems

Source Material from the Event Circle Interviews on PlanetShifter.com

I have a long way to go -- I still drive too often, eat too many processed foods, and take too many flights. But I keep a front-yard garden, commute daily by transit, stick to a vegetarian diet, recycle, compost, and take reusable bags and containers with me wherever I go.

Aaron Lehmer Interview

Through the development of my artistic lifestyle, I've really created an experiment in sustainable living. My artwork, in a way, has become the excuse to talk about the eco issue and sustainability. Just today, I worked with an elementary school to create a sculpture using plastic bottles. By using plastic as a material, I opened the opportunity to talk with the kids about recycling, use of natural materials, pollution issues, and possibilities for making better choices. Many of my projects also very specifically seek to educate about a specific issue, such as recycling, carbon footprint, chemicals pollution or climate change. And, just about any time I do a project, I introduce all of these topics or talk about my own actions as examples to demonstrate that it's really not that hard to be green. I find that just by acting and talking, all of my own sustainability practices inform – or, maybe, spark questions that open the door for conversation. I'm often asked about all of these things, for example, running my car on biodiesel, why I eat vegetarian, local and organic, how I grow my own food, what changes my trash self-portrait inspired, or how the heat in my studio works.

Tim Gaudreau Interview

I am working on a more comprehensive plan for myself so it is really tangible. Composting system is my goal this month....next month it will be Energy reduction. We are working on creating a reproducible system than we can offer to people.

Interview with Lorraine Francis

What comes to mind first is the small-scale composting setup I have on my patio. I wanted to see if this could be done in a small space, and it can be -- with containers and worms! So my food scraps get munched by the worms, making rich soil for the plants that I grow, and thus the food that I eat. It’s a mini-cycle in my home. I also do many other eco-practices in my life, mostly based around Reduce, Reuse, Recycle - minimizing what I buy, seeking to make full use of anything I do buy, then passing items along for further use or proper disposal. As a result, I have a low flow of products in and trash out, which I think is a key component of scaling back our actions to what the earth can sustain - and treating mother nature well!

a href=http://www.planetshifter.com/node/1244 target=”blank”>Interview with Patricia Dines

I’ve volunteered in the past but these days I don’t. I spend a lot of my time involved in education outreach at Kenwood Permaculture. Sometimes I do pro-bono work such as designing a garden for a good cause. I recently created a rainwater harvesting garden design for a man who wanted a demonstration garden for his family and friends. Social justice is at the core of sustainability. Without it, what is the point. I support this work through letter writing, financial contributions, etc.

Interview with Karen Boness

I shop at grocery outlet--sometimes they have really good quality stuff at bargain prices. I'm cheap and dumpster dive a lot. So price is important. But sometimes I like one of those $2 farmers’ market peaches that are so amazing. It feels good to not always eat those peaches, though, so they remain special.

Interview with Novella Carpenter

It’s not that difficult to lead a “green” life. Some things do depend on your economic status, but there are many things we do that don’t cost anything and can produce other positive benefits. Here’s a list - that I hope doesn’t sound too pretentious – that allows us to minimize our impact:

1) We eat an organic vegetarian diet (since 1984) – probably the single biggest personal impact that any person has on the planet.
2) I ride my bike to work and for most errands.
3) We use public transportation as often as we can.
4) We own and use a Neighborhood Electric Vehicle (NEV) that we power with the excess electricity produced by our 2.1. kW PV system.
5) We harvest rainwater.
6) We’ve installed a native plant garden and work on restoration projects in local creeks and parks.
7) We’ve installed low flow toilets and Energy Star appliances.
8) We minimize our consumption that enables us to remain debt free.
9) We save with a community bank and invest our savings in socially screened funds.
10) And while we love children, we don’t have any.
11) We compost.

Interview with Tom Kelly

From a Goodwill perspective, we have an entrepreneurial business model of collecting and selling donated goods. We help communities recycle usable items in environmentally sound ways, and prevent items from piling up in local landfills.

Through socially innovative partnerships with Dell, county and city governments, as well as other organizations, local Goodwill agencies divert used computers and computer equipment from landfills, and provide consumer education on the importance of environmentally-responsible computer disposal. These programs create job training opportunities as well as entry level and skilled green-collar jobs for people in need of work.

The Dell ReConnect Program is a partnership between Goodwill Industries International and Dell Inc. ReConnect. It provides free computer recovery and recycling opportunities for residents of designated areas. The project aims to divert e-waste from landfill (last year it diverted 2.4 million lbs. in San Francisco, San Mateo, and Marin Counties alone) and raised awareness of the importance of responsibly recycling used electronics.

As part of the program, Goodwill refurbishes and distributes computers to residents currently lacking computer access at home, thus helping to close the digital divide. We are also providing sustainable job skill development for our staff and program participants who are working and learning in the program. When computers are not functional enough to be refurbished, we recycle them using a certified recycler that has passed a rigorous Dell environmental and social downstream audit.

Interview with Lauren Lawson

Being active in my local community is one of the most fundamental aspects of my life. Community involvement provides the foundation for social belonging, which in turn creates purpose, systems of support and promotes sustainable well-being. The last 30 years has seen a progression towards a culture of independence, which undermines the benefits of social inter-dependence. As the economy changes, values change with it and it is great to see the emergence of localism in more recent times.

There is something that everyone can do to be involved, whether it's writing for a local magazine, becoming a school governor, contributing to a parish council, shopping locally, making use of public transport, joining a local wildlife group, contributing to a community recycling group or supporting a local charity. The list is almost endless. There is something for all the family and my only regret is the lack of time to do more.

Interview with UK’s Karen Cannard

I’ve made huge gardens, built businesses from recycled goods, made furniture from trash, saved regional ecosystems by organizing community campaigns, planned parks as commons by involving people of all ages proactively in every phase of land improvement. But I’m also trapped in an engineered social structure that forces me to waste precious resources on a car and all the other excesses we all depend on. I hope I get to join in making eco-villages in the very near future, to make a big jump toward healthier living as soon as possible. Anyone else interested in advancing this cause? Leaving Consumerism behind and creating a sustainable culture means building our own world with our own hands, hearts, minds and souls invested with collective wisdom. Money, land, plans, regulations, tools, teams, trucks and site work all come along when the idea is bright and the time is ripe.

Interview with Allen Green

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Willi Paul, Art and Sustainability Consultant
415-407-4688 | willipaul1 at gmail dot com
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